Thursday, February 20, 2020

Coronavirus - is it good for real estate?

The world in recent times has not seen a pestilence quite like the coronavirus and with the interconnectivity of the world today, and the ease of international travel, the panic that has followed should not be too surprising.

Already, we are hearing of the impact that this has had on businesses who are re-assessing their economic exposure to China. Businesses, schools and universities involved in tourism, international education and consumer goods have used this situation to finally act on their suspicions too many of their eggs are in one basket.

The question is what impact this will have on real estate in Australia? Following the news, one can't help but think that it will help. Australia has a reputation around the world as almost an oasis, a far away country that you can escape to. The Chinese government's response to the virus has every effect of making their citizens wonder whether they are safe in the long term. While there are no flights out, one can imagine families in China contemplating a better life in another country.

Currently, the real estate market in Perth does seem to be turning a corner. There are first homebuyers that have been sitting on their cash and earning over the last few years, saving for the right time. Interest rates are as low as they could possibly go and the state of the world probably suggests people will stay in Perth. Even in this little corner of the internet, we have experienced an increase in web traffic as homebuyers start to do their research online such as finding out what are Perth's best and worst suburbs. Time will tell if this is a true recovery for the market.

Tuesday, February 4, 2020

RBA keeps rates at record low of 0.75%

At its meeting today, the Board decided to leave the cash rate unchanged at 0.75 per cent.
The outlook for the global economy remains reasonable. There have been signs that the slowdown in global growth that started in 2018 is coming to an end. Global growth is expected to be a little stronger this year and next than it was last year and inflation remains low almost everywhere. One continuing source of uncertainty, despite recent progress, is the trade and technology dispute between the US and China, which has affected international trade flows and investment. Another source of uncertainty is the coronavirus, which is having a significant effect on the Chinese economy at present. It is too early to determine how long-lasting the impact will be.
Interest rates are very low around the world and a number of central banks eased monetary policy over the second half of last year. There is an expectation of a little further monetary easing in some economies. Long-term government bond yields are around record lows in many countries, including Australia. Borrowing rates for both businesses and households are at historically low levels. The Australian dollar is around its lowest level over recent times.
The central scenario is for the Australian economy to grow by around 2¾ per cent this year and 3 per cent next year, which would be a step up from the growth rates over the past two years. In the short term, the bushfires and the coronavirus outbreak will temporarily weigh on domestic growth. The household sector has been adjusting to a protracted period of slow wages growth and, last year, to a decline in housing prices, with the result that consumption has been quite weak. Following this period of balance-sheet adjustment, consumption growth is expected to pick up gradually. The overall outlook is also being supported by the low level of interest rates, recent tax refunds, ongoing spending on infrastructure, a brighter outlook for the resources sector and, later this year, an expected recovery in residential construction.
The unemployment rate declined in December to 5.1 per cent. It is expected to remain around this level for some time, before gradually declining to a little below 5 per cent in 2021. Wages growth is subdued and is expected to remain at around its current rate for some time yet. A further gradual lift in wages growth would be a welcome development and is needed for inflation to be sustainably within the 2–3 per cent target range. Taken together, recent outcomes suggest that the Australian economy can sustain lower rates of unemployment and underemployment.
Inflation remains low and stable. Over 2019, CPI inflation was 1.8 per cent and underlying inflation was a little lower than this. The central scenario is for CPI inflation to be around 2 per cent in the near term and to fluctuate around that rate over the next couple of years. In underlying terms, inflation is expected to increase gradually to 2 per cent over the next couple of years.
There are continuing signs of a pick-up in established housing markets. This is especially so in Sydney and Melbourne, but prices in some other markets have also increased. Mortgage loan commitments have also picked up, although demand for credit by investors remains subdued. Mortgage rates are at record lows and there is strong competition for borrowers of high credit quality. Credit conditions for small and medium-sized businesses remain tight.
The easing of monetary policy last year is supporting employment and income growth in Australia and a return of inflation to the medium-term target range. The lower cash rate has put downward pressure on the exchange rate, which is supporting activity across a range of industries. Lower interest rates have assisted with the process of household balance sheet adjustment. They have also boosted asset prices, which in time should lead to increased spending, including on residential construction. Progress is expected towards the inflation target and towards full employment, but that progress is expected to remain gradual.
With interest rates having already been reduced to a very low level and recognising the long and variable lags in the transmission of monetary policy, the Board decided to hold the cash rate steady at this meeting. Due to both global and domestic factors, it is reasonable to expect that an extended period of low interest rates will be required in Australia to reach full employment and achieve the inflation target. The Board will continue to monitor developments carefully, including in the labour market. It remains prepared to ease monetary policy further if needed to support sustainable growth in the economy, full employment and the achievement of the inflation target over time.

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Perth newest shopping centre development will be near Murdoch Knowledge Health Precinct



When I was a kid, Kardinya shopping centre was just a strip of shops with Kmart being the main tenant and a grocery store a few steps away. Then in the 90s, they turned it into a shopping centre but it remained an awkward development between the freeway and Fremantle. Recently, Murdoch University has been earmarked to be a large commercial hub, linking with Fiona Stanley Hospital to become a knowledge and health precinct. Murdoch is pushing for more international students and has also started bold plans for more infrastructure along Murdoch Road as Roe Highway is extended to this main artery. So it shouldn't surprise us that Kardinya shopping centre will get an upgrade but no one would have expected this! With apartments, a cinema, swimming pools and climbing walls, the proposed development will increase the complex by 50% to 13,776m2. This could be a good time to look at houses around this area as this should be quite a good development if it goes ahead. There is nothing much in this pocket of Perth, with Garden City to the west and Cockburn to the south and currently nothing in Fremantle, this development does make a lot of sense.

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